Title

Shared visions and local communities: the process of internationalization in librarianship

Submission Type

Paper Abstract Submission

Symposium Selection

International influences

Keywords

International librarianship; Internationalization process; Librarians; Profession; post-Covid era

Abstract

In the library and information profession, there are universal values that define, inform, and guide the professional practice and that are the foundation of the profession itself. These include the freedom of access to information, the right of learning, intellectual freedom, diversity, education, preservation, service, social responsibility, etc. These core values transcend national boundaries, creating an international dimension of the profession. But the internationalization of our profession is not only based on universal values: it also consists of using mutual exchanges to learn new models of practice, explore emerging areas of expertise, share new ideas and innovations.

In this sense, all librarians can refer to internationalization as a way to compare their profession. But how librarians should build a process of internationalization? And what can they learn from that?

Focusing on the common ground and interests that connect librarians from different nations, I will analyze the different ways in which library professionals can initiate their own personal process of internationalization in order to create a shared vision and try to adapt and apply it to the communities in which they work directly. The existing body of literature has explored the nature and scope of international librarianship as a field of study or has approached it as a meaning of international cooperation promoted by library associations and organizations. This paper will explore the role of both practitioners and researchers in engaging in international librarianship. In particular, it will stress the concept that every librarian can approach it.

I will argue that in the near future librarians in different countries will learn from one another in a more straightforward way than before. The current crisis caused by the Covid-19 pandemic has accelerated the implementation and acceptance of virtual exchange, increasing the opportunities for librarians to share professional experiences intensively with colleagues of other nations without the necessity to go abroad. It is probable that a sustainable post-Covid internationalization effort will intensify the international relations and influences in librarianship. Furthermore, the dramatic growth of the Open Access movement will continue to enhance the professional exchange and the learning opportunities for librarians globally. It is hoped that this paper can give inspiration about the contributions we can make in our profession toward internationalization over the next decade.

References:

Bordonaro, K. (2017). International librarianship at home and abroad. Cambridge (MA): Elsevier.

Witt, S. (2014). Agents of change: The rise of international librarianship and the age of globalization. Library Trends, 62(3), 504–518.

Lor, P. (2008). Critical reflections on international librarianship: Adapted from a guest lecture given to the School of Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, 1 July, 2005. Mousaion, 25(1): 1-15.

Stueart, R.D. (2007). International librarianship: A basic guide to global knowledge access. Lanham (MD): Scarecrow Press.

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Shared visions and local communities: the process of internationalization in librarianship

In the library and information profession, there are universal values that define, inform, and guide the professional practice and that are the foundation of the profession itself. These include the freedom of access to information, the right of learning, intellectual freedom, diversity, education, preservation, service, social responsibility, etc. These core values transcend national boundaries, creating an international dimension of the profession. But the internationalization of our profession is not only based on universal values: it also consists of using mutual exchanges to learn new models of practice, explore emerging areas of expertise, share new ideas and innovations.

In this sense, all librarians can refer to internationalization as a way to compare their profession. But how librarians should build a process of internationalization? And what can they learn from that?

Focusing on the common ground and interests that connect librarians from different nations, I will analyze the different ways in which library professionals can initiate their own personal process of internationalization in order to create a shared vision and try to adapt and apply it to the communities in which they work directly. The existing body of literature has explored the nature and scope of international librarianship as a field of study or has approached it as a meaning of international cooperation promoted by library associations and organizations. This paper will explore the role of both practitioners and researchers in engaging in international librarianship. In particular, it will stress the concept that every librarian can approach it.

I will argue that in the near future librarians in different countries will learn from one another in a more straightforward way than before. The current crisis caused by the Covid-19 pandemic has accelerated the implementation and acceptance of virtual exchange, increasing the opportunities for librarians to share professional experiences intensively with colleagues of other nations without the necessity to go abroad. It is probable that a sustainable post-Covid internationalization effort will intensify the international relations and influences in librarianship. Furthermore, the dramatic growth of the Open Access movement will continue to enhance the professional exchange and the learning opportunities for librarians globally. It is hoped that this paper can give inspiration about the contributions we can make in our profession toward internationalization over the next decade.

References:

Bordonaro, K. (2017). International librarianship at home and abroad. Cambridge (MA): Elsevier.

Witt, S. (2014). Agents of change: The rise of international librarianship and the age of globalization. Library Trends, 62(3), 504–518.

Lor, P. (2008). Critical reflections on international librarianship: Adapted from a guest lecture given to the School of Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, 1 July, 2005. Mousaion, 25(1): 1-15.

Stueart, R.D. (2007). International librarianship: A basic guide to global knowledge access. Lanham (MD): Scarecrow Press.