Event Title

Lichen secondary metabolites: Local geographic variation

Presenter Information

Ayla Edmiston, Lander University

Location

Breakout Session B: Biological Sciences

CLC Ballroom

Start Date

8-4-2022 3:30 PM

End Date

8-4-2022 3:45 PM

Description

Although the most common secondary chemicals of the lichen species Usnea strigosa have been identified in different regions throughout the range of the taxon, and chemotypes have been named, smaller differences in secondary chemistry have not been described. In this study, we examined local geographic variation in the suite of secondary chemicals produced by U. strigosa by identifying and comparing the secondary metabolites of samples collected from 11 sites across Greenwood, South Carolina. Potential secondary metabolites of U. strigosa were identified using thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Solvent system C, which contains toluene and acetic acid (170:30) was used to provide an initial analysis of the data as well as to identify the secondary metabolites common in local lichen samples. We predicted that the chemical variation we detected in the suite of chemicals produced by U. strigosa would be better explained by local geographic differences than by individual variation among lichen samples. Although individual lichen samples showed small differences in their secondary chemistry, we found significant local variation between collection sites (ANOSIM, p = .001) and visualized these differences using non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) plots. Further research in this system will include identifying the specific secondary chemicals that are ubiquitous in U. strigosa and those that are responsible for the local variation we observed.

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Apr 8th, 3:30 PM Apr 8th, 3:45 PM

Lichen secondary metabolites: Local geographic variation

Breakout Session B: Biological Sciences

CLC Ballroom

Although the most common secondary chemicals of the lichen species Usnea strigosa have been identified in different regions throughout the range of the taxon, and chemotypes have been named, smaller differences in secondary chemistry have not been described. In this study, we examined local geographic variation in the suite of secondary chemicals produced by U. strigosa by identifying and comparing the secondary metabolites of samples collected from 11 sites across Greenwood, South Carolina. Potential secondary metabolites of U. strigosa were identified using thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Solvent system C, which contains toluene and acetic acid (170:30) was used to provide an initial analysis of the data as well as to identify the secondary metabolites common in local lichen samples. We predicted that the chemical variation we detected in the suite of chemicals produced by U. strigosa would be better explained by local geographic differences than by individual variation among lichen samples. Although individual lichen samples showed small differences in their secondary chemistry, we found significant local variation between collection sites (ANOSIM, p = .001) and visualized these differences using non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) plots. Further research in this system will include identifying the specific secondary chemicals that are ubiquitous in U. strigosa and those that are responsible for the local variation we observed.