Event Title

A Full Screen on Cybervetting

Presenter Information

Katherine Tran, USC Upstate

Location

Breakout Session B: Business & Economics

CASB 104

Start Date

8-4-2022 3:15 PM

End Date

8-4-2022 3:30 PM

Description

Abstract: A Full Screen on Cybervetting Cybervetting, or internet screening, is an informal process to screen potential or existing hires by gathering personal information on internet search engines and social media. It is widely practiced by employers, estimated to be practiced by 70% of HR professionals and hiring managers (Career Builder, 2018). Practitioners claim this is vital information that provides or enhances a first impression and the projection of how the potential employee would represent the brand online. Through screening individuals online, they are able to gather more information that is not presented on formal assessments like resumes and background checks. A potential benefit is that this would be a cost-effective glimpse of both personal and professional images presented by the individual. The behavior of individuals associated with an organization could be very embarrassing and made publicly available online, prompting hiring agents to mitigate this risk by exploring applicants’ behavior online. In contrast, this can pose as an unethical invasion of privacy of employees and potentially a “filtered” image. This screening method is used as an exclusionary tool wherein interpretation can be discriminatory and biased. As this is an informal process, there is little consistency between and across practitioners on how to screen, its interpretation, and predictive value. This lack of consistency results in the impossibility of measuring variables that cybervetting claims to capture and predict; thus, should not give substantial reasoning for employers to use cybervetting as comprehensive, predictive, or exclusionary tool. The methodology and interpretation parallels with the results of unstructured interviews. Though the method may be favored by many practitioners, without adequate standardization and supporting evidence, much of the collected data is faulty and useless, and the practice then lends itself to bias and legal liability. This presentation offers a review of the limited research on the uses and ethical implications of cybervetting. References Career Builder. (2018, August 9). More than half of employers have found content on social media that caused them not to hire a candidate, according to recent Careerbuilder survey [Press release]. https://press.careerbuilder.com/2018-08-09-More-Than-Half-of-Employers-Have-Found-Content-on-Social-Media-That-Caused-Them-NOT-to-Hire-a-Candidate-According-to-Recent-CareerBuilder-Survey

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 8th, 3:15 PM Apr 8th, 3:30 PM

A Full Screen on Cybervetting

Breakout Session B: Business & Economics

CASB 104

Abstract: A Full Screen on Cybervetting Cybervetting, or internet screening, is an informal process to screen potential or existing hires by gathering personal information on internet search engines and social media. It is widely practiced by employers, estimated to be practiced by 70% of HR professionals and hiring managers (Career Builder, 2018). Practitioners claim this is vital information that provides or enhances a first impression and the projection of how the potential employee would represent the brand online. Through screening individuals online, they are able to gather more information that is not presented on formal assessments like resumes and background checks. A potential benefit is that this would be a cost-effective glimpse of both personal and professional images presented by the individual. The behavior of individuals associated with an organization could be very embarrassing and made publicly available online, prompting hiring agents to mitigate this risk by exploring applicants’ behavior online. In contrast, this can pose as an unethical invasion of privacy of employees and potentially a “filtered” image. This screening method is used as an exclusionary tool wherein interpretation can be discriminatory and biased. As this is an informal process, there is little consistency between and across practitioners on how to screen, its interpretation, and predictive value. This lack of consistency results in the impossibility of measuring variables that cybervetting claims to capture and predict; thus, should not give substantial reasoning for employers to use cybervetting as comprehensive, predictive, or exclusionary tool. The methodology and interpretation parallels with the results of unstructured interviews. Though the method may be favored by many practitioners, without adequate standardization and supporting evidence, much of the collected data is faulty and useless, and the practice then lends itself to bias and legal liability. This presentation offers a review of the limited research on the uses and ethical implications of cybervetting. References Career Builder. (2018, August 9). More than half of employers have found content on social media that caused them not to hire a candidate, according to recent Careerbuilder survey [Press release]. https://press.careerbuilder.com/2018-08-09-More-Than-Half-of-Employers-Have-Found-Content-on-Social-Media-That-Caused-Them-NOT-to-Hire-a-Candidate-According-to-Recent-CareerBuilder-Survey