Event Title

Oviposition Site and Egg Mass Characteristics of a New Member of the Two-marked Treehopper (Enchenopa binotata) Species Complex

Location

Breakout Session A: Ecological Sciences

CLC Ballroom

Start Date

8-4-2022 2:30 PM

End Date

8-4-2022 2:45 PM

Description

Abstract— Two-marked treehoppers (Enchenopa binotata) form a complex of 11 closely related species across eastern North America. The members of this species complex have each undergone sympatric speciation following a switch in host tree species. Reproductive isolation is generated as male and female mating calls diverge from their common ancestor. Other traits differ within the complex as well, such as oviposition site and the morphology of egg masses on the host tree. These features may also contribute to speciation within two-marked treehoppers. Here, we describe features of oviposition sites and egg masses for a newly discovered twelfth member of this species complex. This species (E. b. Halesia) lives on the common silverbell tree (Halesia tetraptera var. tetraptera) We collected data on 56 branches from 31 common silverbell trees in Spartanburg County, SC. We compared our oviposition and egg mass data to published data from six other members of the species complex that use other tree species as a host. We found that E. b. Halesia lay eggs in clusters, similar to other members of the complex; however, the clusters are more linear on the branch than most other members. The color of egg masses is white, consistent with all other members of the complex. Unlike most other members of the complex, female two-marked treehoppers deposited egg masses on the bottom of common silverbell branches. This oviposition behavior is only shared with E. b. trifoliata, which lays eggs on the hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata). Egg masses in both E.b. Juglans and E.b. Halesia are an elongated oval shape. We also found that E. b. Halesia laid egg masses further up the branch from the terminal bud (cm) than other members. Overall, we found that this new species has at least one similarity in oviposition site or egg mass clusters to 4 of the 6 other members of the complex. However, based on these features, we found that E. b Halesia is most similar in oviposition behavior to E.b. trifoliata on hoptree. Future work should address whether these differences amongst two-marked treehoppers in oviposition site and egg mass shape have contributed to sympatric speciation within the species complex.

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Apr 8th, 2:30 PM Apr 8th, 2:45 PM

Oviposition Site and Egg Mass Characteristics of a New Member of the Two-marked Treehopper (Enchenopa binotata) Species Complex

Breakout Session A: Ecological Sciences

CLC Ballroom

Abstract— Two-marked treehoppers (Enchenopa binotata) form a complex of 11 closely related species across eastern North America. The members of this species complex have each undergone sympatric speciation following a switch in host tree species. Reproductive isolation is generated as male and female mating calls diverge from their common ancestor. Other traits differ within the complex as well, such as oviposition site and the morphology of egg masses on the host tree. These features may also contribute to speciation within two-marked treehoppers. Here, we describe features of oviposition sites and egg masses for a newly discovered twelfth member of this species complex. This species (E. b. Halesia) lives on the common silverbell tree (Halesia tetraptera var. tetraptera) We collected data on 56 branches from 31 common silverbell trees in Spartanburg County, SC. We compared our oviposition and egg mass data to published data from six other members of the species complex that use other tree species as a host. We found that E. b. Halesia lay eggs in clusters, similar to other members of the complex; however, the clusters are more linear on the branch than most other members. The color of egg masses is white, consistent with all other members of the complex. Unlike most other members of the complex, female two-marked treehoppers deposited egg masses on the bottom of common silverbell branches. This oviposition behavior is only shared with E. b. trifoliata, which lays eggs on the hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata). Egg masses in both E.b. Juglans and E.b. Halesia are an elongated oval shape. We also found that E. b. Halesia laid egg masses further up the branch from the terminal bud (cm) than other members. Overall, we found that this new species has at least one similarity in oviposition site or egg mass clusters to 4 of the 6 other members of the complex. However, based on these features, we found that E. b Halesia is most similar in oviposition behavior to E.b. trifoliata on hoptree. Future work should address whether these differences amongst two-marked treehoppers in oviposition site and egg mass shape have contributed to sympatric speciation within the species complex.