Event Title

SS5 -- First-Generation College Students and the Effects of Academic Entitlement

Location

URC Greatroom

Start Date

8-4-2022 10:30 AM

End Date

8-4-2022 12:15 PM

Description

Abstract Though the amount of first-generation (FG) college students entering into universities has been continuously increasing, they still represent an underserved and disconnected population on college campuses. The goal of this research project is to investigate characteristics unique to FG students where future interventions may target. For example, we know that FG students tend to be low in socioeconomic status (SES) (Canning et al., 2020). Because low SES correlates with low academic entitlement, it suggests that FG students might also have low academic entitlement (Côté et al., 2021; McCallen and Johnson, 2020). Academic entitlement (AE) is when a student feels as though they deserve great success or special treatment regardless of effort (Bonaccio et al., 2016; Wasieleski et al., 2014). A moderate level of academic entitlement can be beneficial to students, but being too high or too low in academic entitlement can create issues for individuals both academically and socially. If FG students truly do have too low of AE, they may not feel deserving enough to question professors or reach out for help (Boswell, 2011; Sohr-Preston & Boswell, 2015). The present study explores whether academic entitlement is connected to first-generation status in college students and how these factors may influence how these students seek help from those around them. After identifying 125 first-generation students and 129 continuing-generation students in a pre-survey, we then invited these participants to complete a self-report survey that included items addressing academic entitlement, help-seeking, perception of college authority, their efficacy in college courses, social network capital, and their demographics. Both surveys were administered through the Prolific website. Controlling for age, we found that academic entitlement (AE) did not predict FG status. Instead, social network capital significantly correlated with FG status, our help-seeking variables, SES, and self-efficacy. This suggests that a primary barrier for FG students is their access to social networks, not their individual level of entitlement. This information can provide universities with a greater understanding of the experiences of first-generation students, as well as how to better support them and help improve their college experiences both in the classroom and outside of the classroom. Keywords: First-generation, academic entitlement, help-seeking, college

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Apr 8th, 10:30 AM Apr 8th, 12:15 PM

SS5 -- First-Generation College Students and the Effects of Academic Entitlement

URC Greatroom

Abstract Though the amount of first-generation (FG) college students entering into universities has been continuously increasing, they still represent an underserved and disconnected population on college campuses. The goal of this research project is to investigate characteristics unique to FG students where future interventions may target. For example, we know that FG students tend to be low in socioeconomic status (SES) (Canning et al., 2020). Because low SES correlates with low academic entitlement, it suggests that FG students might also have low academic entitlement (Côté et al., 2021; McCallen and Johnson, 2020). Academic entitlement (AE) is when a student feels as though they deserve great success or special treatment regardless of effort (Bonaccio et al., 2016; Wasieleski et al., 2014). A moderate level of academic entitlement can be beneficial to students, but being too high or too low in academic entitlement can create issues for individuals both academically and socially. If FG students truly do have too low of AE, they may not feel deserving enough to question professors or reach out for help (Boswell, 2011; Sohr-Preston & Boswell, 2015). The present study explores whether academic entitlement is connected to first-generation status in college students and how these factors may influence how these students seek help from those around them. After identifying 125 first-generation students and 129 continuing-generation students in a pre-survey, we then invited these participants to complete a self-report survey that included items addressing academic entitlement, help-seeking, perception of college authority, their efficacy in college courses, social network capital, and their demographics. Both surveys were administered through the Prolific website. Controlling for age, we found that academic entitlement (AE) did not predict FG status. Instead, social network capital significantly correlated with FG status, our help-seeking variables, SES, and self-efficacy. This suggests that a primary barrier for FG students is their access to social networks, not their individual level of entitlement. This information can provide universities with a greater understanding of the experiences of first-generation students, as well as how to better support them and help improve their college experiences both in the classroom and outside of the classroom. Keywords: First-generation, academic entitlement, help-seeking, college