Event Title

PS5 -- Examining the Role of Bystander Intervention in Vehicular Heatstroke

Presenter Information

Giselle Solorio, USC UpstateFollow

Location

URC Greatroom

Start Date

8-4-2022 10:30 AM

End Date

8-4-2022 12:15 PM

Description

Vehicular heatstroke has consistently been one of the leading causes of U.S. non-crash child fatalities. Although pediatric vehicular heatstroke is usually caused by parents (or caregivers) unintentionally leaving their child alone in a hot car, it is unclear how bystander intervention plays a role in these specific situations. In the current study, our goal was to gain a better understanding about the conditions in which a bystander is likely to intervene when confronted with a hazardous situation. A sample of students at USC Upstate volunteered to be a part of the study. Participants were randomly assigned to read a scenario involving an infant or dog left alone in a hot vehicle, and the infant or dog was showing signs of distress or no distress. After reading the scenario, participants completed Likert questions about their likelihood of intervening and level of concern. It was predicted that participants would be more likely to intervene when the infant or dog showed signs of distress. In addition, it was predicted that participants would be more likely to intervene when an infant is left alone in a hot car rather than a dog. Implications from this work help to shed light on the dynamics of human-animal relationships and the role of moral decision making in a specific case of neglect.

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Apr 8th, 10:30 AM Apr 8th, 12:15 PM

PS5 -- Examining the Role of Bystander Intervention in Vehicular Heatstroke

URC Greatroom

Vehicular heatstroke has consistently been one of the leading causes of U.S. non-crash child fatalities. Although pediatric vehicular heatstroke is usually caused by parents (or caregivers) unintentionally leaving their child alone in a hot car, it is unclear how bystander intervention plays a role in these specific situations. In the current study, our goal was to gain a better understanding about the conditions in which a bystander is likely to intervene when confronted with a hazardous situation. A sample of students at USC Upstate volunteered to be a part of the study. Participants were randomly assigned to read a scenario involving an infant or dog left alone in a hot vehicle, and the infant or dog was showing signs of distress or no distress. After reading the scenario, participants completed Likert questions about their likelihood of intervening and level of concern. It was predicted that participants would be more likely to intervene when the infant or dog showed signs of distress. In addition, it was predicted that participants would be more likely to intervene when an infant is left alone in a hot car rather than a dog. Implications from this work help to shed light on the dynamics of human-animal relationships and the role of moral decision making in a specific case of neglect.