Event Title

NU2 -- How Does the Use of Cannabis Effect Cancer-Related Symptoms, Such as Pain, for Individuals with Advanced Cancer?

Location

URC Greatroom

Start Date

8-4-2022 10:30 AM

End Date

8-4-2022 12:15 PM

Description

Patients with advanced cancer may experience severe pain, nausea, and loss of appetite. These symptoms are often not adequately relieved by pharmacological interventions. In the management of these symptoms, current pharmacological treatment includes opioids, nonopioids, and adjuvant analgesics. As with other illnesses, patients may turn to alternative substances or therapies for symptom management. One substance that has become increasingly popular in the United States is cannabis. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognizes cannabis as a Schedule I drug, meaning there is no currently accepted medical use, and it has high abuse potential. However, at this time, 37 states have approved cannabis for medical use, and 18 states have legalized recreational use. As the legality of cannabis becomes more prevalent, patients with advanced cancer may begin to use it as an alternative therapy. As with other common alternative therapies, nursing and other healthcare professionals must be equipped to educate patients on the possible benefits and risks surrounding cannabis use for symptom management. The purpose of this research was to answer the clinical question, “How does the use of cannabis affect cancer-related symptoms, such as pain, for individuals with advanced cancer?” A systematic search was conducted using the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) database to identify studies focusing on pain management for patients with cancer and cannabis. Thirty-three research articles were identified, after review of titles and abstracts, ten were determined to be relevant to the clinical question and appraised. While several articles included the potential for bias, many of the identified studies suggested a relationship between patients who use cannabis and a reduction in cancer-related symptoms. The identified studies concluded that when cannabis was used in conjunction with standard medical treatment, many patients experienced an improved quality of life, pain, the ability to cope with pain, and better sleep quality. One study found that patients who used cannabis in conjunction with their prescribed medical treatment had slightly worse symptoms than those who used only prescribed medication. This topic is of growing importance to nurses and other healthcare providers that help manage patients’ symptoms and educate patients regarding pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and alternative therapies.

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Apr 8th, 10:30 AM Apr 8th, 12:15 PM

NU2 -- How Does the Use of Cannabis Effect Cancer-Related Symptoms, Such as Pain, for Individuals with Advanced Cancer?

URC Greatroom

Patients with advanced cancer may experience severe pain, nausea, and loss of appetite. These symptoms are often not adequately relieved by pharmacological interventions. In the management of these symptoms, current pharmacological treatment includes opioids, nonopioids, and adjuvant analgesics. As with other illnesses, patients may turn to alternative substances or therapies for symptom management. One substance that has become increasingly popular in the United States is cannabis. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognizes cannabis as a Schedule I drug, meaning there is no currently accepted medical use, and it has high abuse potential. However, at this time, 37 states have approved cannabis for medical use, and 18 states have legalized recreational use. As the legality of cannabis becomes more prevalent, patients with advanced cancer may begin to use it as an alternative therapy. As with other common alternative therapies, nursing and other healthcare professionals must be equipped to educate patients on the possible benefits and risks surrounding cannabis use for symptom management. The purpose of this research was to answer the clinical question, “How does the use of cannabis affect cancer-related symptoms, such as pain, for individuals with advanced cancer?” A systematic search was conducted using the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) database to identify studies focusing on pain management for patients with cancer and cannabis. Thirty-three research articles were identified, after review of titles and abstracts, ten were determined to be relevant to the clinical question and appraised. While several articles included the potential for bias, many of the identified studies suggested a relationship between patients who use cannabis and a reduction in cancer-related symptoms. The identified studies concluded that when cannabis was used in conjunction with standard medical treatment, many patients experienced an improved quality of life, pain, the ability to cope with pain, and better sleep quality. One study found that patients who used cannabis in conjunction with their prescribed medical treatment had slightly worse symptoms than those who used only prescribed medication. This topic is of growing importance to nurses and other healthcare providers that help manage patients’ symptoms and educate patients regarding pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and alternative therapies.