Event Title

GH1 -- The Ubuntu Healing Project: Implementation of Ubuntu groups to assess Burnout, Social Isolation, and Belonging in an Undergraduate Medical Educational setting

Location

URC Greatroom

Start Date

8-4-2022 10:30 AM

End Date

8-4-2022 12:15 PM

Description

The ravaging effects of the COVID-19 pandemic place healthcare providers including nurses, residents, physicians, and medical students at increased risk for burnout and social isolation; factors that both significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality. As disruptions to daily life cause much physical, emotional, and mental turmoil, the pandemic emphasizes a need for connection. The Ubuntu Healing Project seeks to harness the healing power of human connection and conversation to promote physical, emotional, and mental wellness. The South African philosophy, “Ubuntu,” means, "I am because you are." In essence, no matter who we are or where we are in the world, we are all connected by our humanity. At the UofSCSOMG, Ubuntu groups were implemented to create a safe space for open dialogue that bridged differences across social identity, allowing for a better understanding of people’s lived experiences and our shared human connection. Six students and five faculty/staff members were trained to lead an Ubuntu group. 70 participants within the learning community then signed up to join one of the 11 Ubuntu groups, including 45 medical students, 13 faculty members, and 12 staff members. Ubuntu groups met for eight 1-hour sessions from October to December 2021. Implementation data was collected throughout the intervention along with pre- and post-surveys. Qualitative and quantitative data analysis will be done using Atlas.ti qualitative data analysis software and SPSS statistical software. Monitoring the implementation of the project allowed us to track the facilitators' progress, measure for program attrition, and assess the themes from the meetings. Initial review of word counts in the qualitative data reveal positive experiences; the most frequent words used to describe the project were: “enlightening, comforting, community, and thought-provoking”. Class or work responsibilities were most often identified as a barrier to participation; however, 96% of the participants were very or extremely likely to recommend others participate in the project. Data analyses are ongoing, yet stories being told by facilitators and participants show that this intervention is proving to be an influential community-building experience. These results can explain the power of human connection, allowing for more targeted and informed approaches that can better evaluate the long-term and sustained effects of Ubuntu groups. Assessing belongingness among medical students, faculty, and staff provides an opportunity to mitigate burnout and social isolation. Diversion of such negative outcomes can improve individual health, and also the health of the community to which we belong.

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Apr 8th, 10:30 AM Apr 8th, 12:15 PM

GH1 -- The Ubuntu Healing Project: Implementation of Ubuntu groups to assess Burnout, Social Isolation, and Belonging in an Undergraduate Medical Educational setting

URC Greatroom

The ravaging effects of the COVID-19 pandemic place healthcare providers including nurses, residents, physicians, and medical students at increased risk for burnout and social isolation; factors that both significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality. As disruptions to daily life cause much physical, emotional, and mental turmoil, the pandemic emphasizes a need for connection. The Ubuntu Healing Project seeks to harness the healing power of human connection and conversation to promote physical, emotional, and mental wellness. The South African philosophy, “Ubuntu,” means, "I am because you are." In essence, no matter who we are or where we are in the world, we are all connected by our humanity. At the UofSCSOMG, Ubuntu groups were implemented to create a safe space for open dialogue that bridged differences across social identity, allowing for a better understanding of people’s lived experiences and our shared human connection. Six students and five faculty/staff members were trained to lead an Ubuntu group. 70 participants within the learning community then signed up to join one of the 11 Ubuntu groups, including 45 medical students, 13 faculty members, and 12 staff members. Ubuntu groups met for eight 1-hour sessions from October to December 2021. Implementation data was collected throughout the intervention along with pre- and post-surveys. Qualitative and quantitative data analysis will be done using Atlas.ti qualitative data analysis software and SPSS statistical software. Monitoring the implementation of the project allowed us to track the facilitators' progress, measure for program attrition, and assess the themes from the meetings. Initial review of word counts in the qualitative data reveal positive experiences; the most frequent words used to describe the project were: “enlightening, comforting, community, and thought-provoking”. Class or work responsibilities were most often identified as a barrier to participation; however, 96% of the participants were very or extremely likely to recommend others participate in the project. Data analyses are ongoing, yet stories being told by facilitators and participants show that this intervention is proving to be an influential community-building experience. These results can explain the power of human connection, allowing for more targeted and informed approaches that can better evaluate the long-term and sustained effects of Ubuntu groups. Assessing belongingness among medical students, faculty, and staff provides an opportunity to mitigate burnout and social isolation. Diversion of such negative outcomes can improve individual health, and also the health of the community to which we belong.