https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13309">
 

Faculty Publications

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Large igneous provinces, as the surface expression of deep mantle processes, play a key role in the evolution of the planet. Here we analyse the geochemical record and timing of the Pacific Ocean Large Igneous Provinces and preserved accreted terranes to reconstruct the history of pulses of mantle plume upwellings and their relation with a deep-rooted source like the Pacific large low-shear velocity Province during the Mid-Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous. Petrological modelling and geochemical data suggest the need of interaction between these deep-rooted upwellings and mid-ocean ridges in pulses separated by ∼10–20 Ma, to generate the massive volumes of melt preserved today as oceanic plateaus. These pulses impacted the marine biota resulting in episodes of anoxia and mass extinctions shortly after their eruption.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13309

APA Citation

Madrigal, P., Gazel, E., Flores, K. E., Bizimis, M., & Jicha, B. (2016). Record of massive upwellings from the Pacific large low shear velocity province. Nature Communications, 7(1), 13309. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13309

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