Date of Award

Summer 2019

Document Type

Open Access Dissertation

Department

Educational Studies

First Advisor

James Kirylo

Abstract

The purpose of this action research study was to examine the impact that the Embedded Voice Technique of writing instruction had on one’s writer’s voice. The teacher-researcher posits that voice is not an individual component of writing, but rather a culmination of multiple components of writing; it is the sum of parts rather than a part in and of itself. The study took place in an English 3-Honors class with nine randomly chosen participants over an eight-week period. Data were collected using a variety of data collection instruments. Pre and post-treatment Likert scale surveys determinee participants’ dispositions regarding writing. Pre and post-treatment questionnaires generated additional insights. Pre and post-treatment interviews were established from the questionnaire responses and teacher-researcher interest. Participant artifacts were collected throughout the study. These were the result of guided practice activities that were designed to intentionally build voice in student writing and were assessed and peer-reviewed using a teacher-researcher created essay rubric. The final data-collection tool utilized was teacher-researcher observations. As a result of the study, findings support the claim, that the Embedded Voice Technique can enhance writer’s voice and links writing ability and writer’s voice to writing confidence/efficacy and peer interactions.

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