Date of Award

1-1-2009

Document Type

Campus Access Thesis

Department

Anthropology

First Advisor

Joanna Casey

Abstract

Current understandings of settlement and technological activity in the Middle Savnnah River Valley of South Carolina suggest that Early Archaic (10,000-8,000 BP) peoples enjoyed a high level of mobility, were focused on high quality, siliceous Coastal Plain chert, and were organized in a logistical manner- with large residences in close proximity to river terraces along the Savannah River, and smaller resource processing and extraction loci in upland locations. This thesis tests current understandings of settlement and technology during the Early Archaic in the Middle Savannah River Valley using 17 Early Archaic lithic debitage assemblages. Because understandings Early Archaic settlement are based largely on finished and formal tool types, the use of the debris from tool manufacture is useful. This study highlights broad differences in terms of tool production activities between both river terrace, and upland sites that have implications for settlement, technology, and human organization during the Early Archaic in the Middle Savannah River Valley of South Carolina. A combination of both Mass and Attibute Analysis is used to highlight broad differences in the character of Early Archaic Settlement, in terms the primary technological activities that occurred at sites in a variety of settings. The results of this analysis offer broad consonance with current understandings of settlement and technological organization during the Early Archaic in the Middle Savannah River Valley.

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