Date of Award

1-1-2011

Document Type

Campus Access Thesis

Department

Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Sub-Department

Epidemiology

First Advisor

Robert E McKeown

Abstract

Purpose This study identifies correlates of medication use for youth aged 4-17 diagnosed with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) separately among those who are non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, and multiracial.

Method Data were obtained from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a cross-sectional telephone survey using parent-reported information about their child. Racial and ethnic specific associations between ADHD medication and sex, age, geographic region, poverty level, insurance status, severity of symptoms, behavior/conduct problems, and sensitivity of ADHD and non-ADHD related health care providers to values and customs were assessed using multiple logistic regression.

Results Medication use was more prevalent among non-Hispanic Whites than minority groups; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Among non-Hispanic Whites, children aged 4-14, those living in the South and Midwest, those with parent-reported "moderate" and "severe" ADHD, and those who felt their health care provider was more often sensitive to their values and customs had a higher odds of ADHD medication use. Among non-Hispanic Blacks, children aged 11-14 years and those with parent-reported "severe" ADHD had a higher odds of ADHD medication use. Among Hispanics, males, those with public insurance, children living at 100% of the poverty level and below, those with parent reported "moderate" or "severe" ADHD, and those who felt their health care provider was more often sensitive to their values and customs had a higher odds of ADHD medication use. Among the multiracial group, those above 300% of the poverty level and those with "severe" ADHD had a higher odds of ADHD medication. Among all groups, parental opinion of the severity of symptoms was the most highly correlated with ADHD medication use.

Conclusion These data suggest similarities as well as differences in correlates of ADHD medication use exist between racial and ethnic groups. This information from a cross-sectional study provides direction for future studies that seek to understand racial and ethnic disparities regarding ADHD medication use.

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