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Aims & Scope

The Aims of Studies in Scottish Literature

The original aims of the journal were outlined by Ross Roy in his preface to the first number (SSL I:1, July 1963, p. 3): "Studies in Scottish Literature was founded with the idea of creating a common meeting ground for work embracing all aspects of the great Scottish literary heritage. It is not the organ of any school or faction; it welcomes all shades of opinion. . . . As a journal devoted to a vigorous living literature it will carry articles on contemporary authors."

Scope of Articles Considered

The journal accepts high-quality submissions on a full range of Scottish literary topics and periods, including scholarship on the relations between Scottish and other literatures and on interdisciplinary topics substantially involving literature. In addition to regular articles, each volume now includes a substantial cluster of articles on a special issue or topic, beginning in vol. 38 with articles on current trends and opportunities in Scottish literary studies. The journal also considers shorter articles or notes making available significant manuscripts or documents. Each volume includes occasional review-essays and reviews and an annotated list of books received.

Suggested Article Length

The suggested length for a regular article is 4,000-7,000 words (including footnotes), and for notes or documents 1500-2500 words. Articles and notes can only be considered when a completed text has been submitted in a form suitable for specialist review, but contributors who have questions about the eligibility of a topic or approach, or the length of their proposed article, are invited to contact the editors ahead of formal submission. Symposium contributions and review articles are normally by invitation.

Format/Citation Style

References and citations in Studies in Scottish Literature are given in a modified footnote form, i.e. with a full footnote for the first reference to a source and parenthetical references in the text for repeated citations from a single text where that will be clear to a reader. Shorter quotations given in the text should be in double quote marks (U.S. style), rather than single quotes. Longer quotations should be given as indented single-spaced blocks. In footnote references, the name of the publisher should be given, as well as place of publication. As a general guide, refer to the Chicago Manual of Style.