Date of Award

6-30-2016

Document Type

Open Access Dissertation

Department

Health Services and Policy Management

First Advisor

M Mahmud Khan

Abstract

Backgrounds: Home health aides’ job satisfaction and intent to quit have been attributed to organizational and community level factors. The objective is to determine the effects of individual-, organizational-, and community-level factors on job satisfaction or intent to quit among home health aides.

Methods: This research used data from two subsets of the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey and the 2007 National Home Health Aides Survey, sampling six eligible workers across the agencies in the Unites States. As another data source, the present study uses Area Health Resource File. The author used hierarchical linear modeling technique for handling hierarchically nested data structures. The author conducted two-level logistic regression analysis for dichotomous responses of the outcomes using GLLAMMs (Generalized Linear Latent And Mixed Models) in STATA 13.0/SE (Rabe-Hesketh, Skrondal, & Pickles, 2004).

Results: Benefits, age, and household income were found to be predicting variables for home health aides’ job satisfaction. Ownership, location, patient care revenue sources, and patient assignment were also found to be predictors for job satisfaction and intent to quit among home health aides. Being respected, being trusted, being involved in challenging work, and being confident were contributing factors to higher level of job satisfaction. However, being involved in challenging and being confident contributed to a reduction in home health aides’ intent to leave their jobs. In addition, supervisor quality and being valued by their agencies were found to be predictors for job satisfaction and intent to quit. These factors were also found to be moderating factors in the relationship between individual-level work related factors and job satisfaction or intent to quit and between individual-level job perception and job satisfaction or intent to quit. High unemployment rates in the communities was found to be a predicting factor for job satisfaction and intent to quit among home health aides.

Conclusions: The findings are a clear indication that supervisor quality and organizational values are the most significant predictors of home health aides’ job satisfaction and intent to quit. Therefore, addressing supervisor and organizational supportiveness may increase job satisfaction and reduce intent to quit by home health aides.

Share

COinS