Date of Award

1-1-2010

Document Type

Campus Access Thesis

Department

Art

Sub-Department

Art History

First Advisor

Bradford Collins

Abstract

René Magritte's body of work demonstrates not only a loyalty to the principles of Belgian Surrealism but also to those of Breton's mainstream Parisian group. His connection to the latter is particularly evident in the artist's paintings of the female nude produced from 1930-1962. Today, these of Magritte's pieces beg feminist analysis. The artist's crude, rather misogynistic treatment of the female body works on two levels. It is initially an art for Magritte, a means by which he can liberate his own libido; but at the same time, the Belgian's pictures make clear to viewers women's all too often role as victim in patriarchal society.

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