Date of Award

1-1-2012

Document Type

Campus Access Dissertation

Department

Educational Studies

Sub-Department

School Psychology

First Advisor

E Scott Huebner

Abstract

Electronic bullying is considered by many to be the newest form of aggressive bullying behavior. This paper examines the relationships among electronic bullying and victimization and the domains of life satisfaction in middle school students. A total of 843 7th and 8th grade students were separated into four groups based on their self-reported experiences with electronic bullying and victimization: bully, victim, bully-victim, and not involved. Analyses revealed that those students not involved in either electronic bullying or victimization reported significantly higher mean global life satisfaction scores as compared to electronic victims, as well as combined bully-victims. Electronic victims reported significantly lower family, environment, and school satisfaction as compared to those not involved, as well as significantly lower self satisfaction as compared to combined electronic bully-victims. Electronic bullies reported significantly higher self-satisfaction as compared to combined electronic bully-victims. Combined electronic bully-victims reported significantly lower family, friend, living environment and school satisfaction as compared to those students not involved, as well as significantly lower self satisfaction as compared to all other groups. A significant interaction between gender and group membership on life satisfaction outcomes was found. Follow up analyses revealed that girls' global life satisfaction scores were significantly lower than boys' scores for the electronic victim and the combined electronic bully-victims groups, but not for the other two groups. A significant interaction for age was not found.

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